Tapeworms

Tapeworms, or cestodes, are flatworms (dorsoventrally compressed, segmented, and tape-like worms) that can live in the human gastrointestinal tract.

Adult tapeworms consist of three parts: a scolex (head), a neck, and a segmented body (also called strobila). The head has several hooks, suckers, or grooves that are mainly used to bind to the intestine of the host. Strobila (body or trunk) is composed of a chain of proglottids (immature, mature, and gravid) or segments. Each segment of the body is known as a proglottid and has a complete set of reproductive organs (tapeworms are hermaphroditic).

Humans are the only definitive host for two species of Taenia, namely Taenia solium (pork tapeworm) and Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm). T. asiatica is mainly found in pigs in some countries of Southeast Asia such as Vietnam, Indonesia, and Taiwan.

Taenia Solium: Life Cycle, Pathogenesis and Lab Diagnosis

Taenia Solium: Life Cycle, Pathogenesis and Lab Diagnosis

Tenia solium, also known as pork tapeworm, causes Taeniasis, an infection that is common amongst people eating raw pork containing the cysticerci.

Taenia solium vs. Taenia saginata 

Taenia solium vs. Taenia saginata 

Taeniasis is caused by both Taenia solium and Taenia saginata but only infections with Taenia solium may cause cysticercosis. Find out why